yaleadmissions:

From Yale’s 12 residential colleges boasting suites, common rooms, libraries, courtyards, and more, to the 22-building network of libraries, the surrounding campus filled with classrooms, and the city of New Haven offering coffee shops and public spaces of its own, there really is no shortage of study spaces on and around Yale’s campus. Whether reading a book in the comforts of your bedroom, or meeting in one of Bass library’s reservable group study rooms, the when and where of studying is left up to you.  Here is a brief compilation of popular study spots on campus, but this is by no means an exclusive list!

(Additional Photos: Michael Marsland, Kamaria Greenfield)

Founders Day events will be held on Tuesday, October 14, with open houses at the President’s House and Woodbridge Hall and other locations from 11:00am to 3:00pm, as well as pop-up performances by student performers around campus. The Founders Day Celebration will culminate on the Cross Campus from 4:30pm to 6:00pm with remarks by President Salovey, student group performances, festive food, and more!

Enter the #InspiringYale Instagram contest for a chance to win lunch with President Salovey and other great prizes.

yaleadmissions:

This past Sunday, the Yale College Council and Yale Dining collaborated to host Fall Fest on Old Campus.  Open to all undergraduate students, this annual, outdoor festival showcases cuisine from around the world, with representation from many countries across most continents.  The late-September weather proved perfect for the event, as thousands of undergrads turned out with their friends to sample foods ranging from Canadian Avocado Turkey Burgers to Ethiopian Doro Wat with Iniera.  While the global format stays the same, Yale Dining makes sure to highlight different dishes each year. 

yalepress:

On this day, in 1890, Congress established Yosemite National Park. It was the third National Park in the U.S., after Yellowstone and Sequoia, thanks to lobbying from John Muir and other environmental activists. 

Richard Sellars provides a detailed history of the formation of the national parks in Preserving Nature in the National Parks. The book traces the epic clash of values between traditional scenery-and-tourism management and emerging ecological concepts in America’s most treasured landscapes and provides an analysis of why the Service has not responded in full faith to the environmental concerns of recent times.

Anne Zlatow ‘18 nominated Ms. Adrienne Fluitt, college counselor and teacher at BASIS Oro Valley School, for the Yale Educator Award. The award recognizes high school educators who have supported and inspired their students to achieve at high levels. "Simultaneously respected teacher and approachable friend, Ms. Fluitt teaches many subjects and makes each worth learning. If the advice she gives were mass-produced for fortune cookies, certainly the world would see greater success. Teacher, counselor, leader, mediator, mother, sister, friend, etc., Ms. Fluitt deserves much celebration, and, at the very least, recognition."

Anne Zlatow ‘18 nominated Ms. Adrienne Fluitt, college counselor and teacher at BASIS Oro Valley School, for the Yale Educator Award. The award recognizes high school educators who have supported and inspired their students to achieve at high levels.

"Simultaneously respected teacher and approachable friend, Ms. Fluitt teaches many subjects and makes each worth learning. If the advice she gives were mass-produced for fortune cookies, certainly the world would see greater success. Teacher, counselor, leader, mediator, mother, sister, friend, etc., Ms. Fluitt deserves much celebration, and, at the very least, recognition."

Andrew Saydjari ‘18 nominated Ms. Scarseth, math teacher at Lincoln High School, for the Yale Educator Award. The award recognizes high school educators who have supported and inspired their students to achieve at high levels.  “She tailored her teaching style to each student’s needs—not what we wanted, but truly needed. For me, it was her “work smarter, not harder theorem.” I always looked to do problems the “right” way, but she taught me there is none, only the most efficient. If I could solve it using commonsense, then, by wasting time applying some theorem, I gained nothing—in fact, I comprehended less.”

Andrew Saydjari ‘18 nominated Ms. Scarseth, math teacher at Lincoln High School, for the Yale Educator Award. The award recognizes high school educators who have supported and inspired their students to achieve at high levels.

“She tailored her teaching style to each student’s needs—not what we wanted, but truly needed. For me, it was her “work smarter, not harder theorem.” I always looked to do problems the “right” way, but she taught me there is none, only the most efficient. If I could solve it using commonsense, then, by wasting time applying some theorem, I gained nothing—in fact, I comprehended less.”